Clinical Psychology, Psychological Assessment and Anger Management

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Counseling with the LGBTQ Community


Coming out


In these days of marriage equality, one might be tempted to think that lesbians and gay men experience no discrimination or problems from society. That would be a mistake. While tremendous strides have been made in this direction discrimination and even persecution of lesbian and gay people still an ever-present concern. LGBTQ youth are still at higher risk of suicide than their peers. This is not just because of societies lack of acceptance and bullying from peers but also because internalized homophobia. Internalized homophobia is where someone's self-esteem is negatively impacted because they are LGBTQ and find they cannot accept themselves because they have taken on the rejection of others and made it their own. Internalized homophobia can often be associated with feelings of guilt and worthlessness, self-loathing, fearfulness, depression and anxiety, which in extreme cases can lead to suicidal thoughts or actions.

Learning to accept oneself, with all the that entails, is a lifelong struggle for most people. The specific pressures and expectations placed upon LGBTQ people fix the problem more complex than for others. Sometimes, it helps to have someone to talk to and work through the issues related to self-acceptance and coming out.


Gay relationships


Like many things in life, romantic relationships can be very rewarding yet at the same time very challenging. Human beings are not say the social animals that they seek pair bonding; a place where they can be accepted, loved, valued, and where they can reciprocate in return. Although now lesbians and gay men have obtained marriage equality there remain some unique pressures not found in their heterosexual equivalents. In particular, while gay relationships may have the legal status of marriage they do not always conform with the prevailing heterosexual morality. Some choose monogamy, some choose open relationships, and yet others may choose polyandry. Finding someone to help you think through the implications of your relationship choices can be difficult, especially if you feel judged and humiliated. Dr. Warrington provides a confidential space where you can explore these and other relationship issues free of prejudice or preconceived ideas.


Gender queer


In addition to the problems faced by their lesbian and gay sisters and brothers, people whose gender identity does not fit neatly within the bipolar categories found in most of society, faced their own unique sets of difficulties. Whether they identify with gender other than that with which they were born or if they perceive themselves to be a third gender, the road to acceptance, even self-acceptance, can be a long and difficult one.


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LGBTQ links